Perception and Dissonance: The Challenge of Overcoming Genre

The unmistakable tinge of a major second was palpable. Harsh, crunching artificial noise emanated from a loosely tuned guitar. Heads bobbed and banged. The sound was note-against-note, a harmonic layout that offers more tension than it does release. Yet the audience didn’t seem to mind at all, screaming along in human articulation to the scream of amplified metal strings. The catharsis of a punk show … Continue reading Perception and Dissonance: The Challenge of Overcoming Genre

Mitski’s “Two Slow Dancers” and the Musical Depiction of Growth

TO THINK THAT WE COULD STAY THE SAME TO THINK THAT WE COULD STAY THE SAME TO THINK THAT WE COULD STAY THE SAME The silence of the morning is the only kind of silence that doesn’t suffocate you. It frees you. We talk a lot about the soundtracks of our lives: silence, alarms, trains, nature, songs, the list goes on. We talk a lot … Continue reading Mitski’s “Two Slow Dancers” and the Musical Depiction of Growth

Love, Attachment, and Music: From the 16th Century to the 21st

Music often helps us understand our own emotions and commiserate with each other about feelings we’ve all felt before, both good and bad. Much music exerts energy on describing close interpersonal relationships, and that has always been popular subject matter. To that end, we see secular music of hundreds of years ago exploring the pains and joys of love, just like much of our current … Continue reading Love, Attachment, and Music: From the 16th Century to the 21st

Music, Technology, and Discovery

My sparkling red portable CD player arrived in the mail, bought with an Amazon gift card that my uncle mailed me for a birthday. I was thrilled. I slid the AA batteries in the little opening on the bottom, shut the clasp, and popped Michelle Branch’s Hotel Paper onto its wheel. I was listening with those headphones that fit over your head but are way … Continue reading Music, Technology, and Discovery